Monday, November 28, 2016

Welcome to the Wisconsin Employment Resource Connection!



ABOUT WERC


The Wisconsin Employment Resource Connection (WERC) is an employment partnership program designed to provide relevant and timely workforce training and job-placement assistance to Wisconsin military Service Members and their spouses. The program's specialized education, training, and job-search services will enhance each participant's abilities to obtain and retain meaningful employment.


Employment Assistance: Our WERC Team offers one-on-one career and employment counseling. We help participants identify aptitudes and abilities developed in the military, arrive at a plan for transferring them to a civilian job setting, and assist program participants in understanding and mastering key job-search resources and services for optimal job placement. WERC also provides assistance with resume and cover letter creation/review; application assistance; mock interviews; education options; employer connections; job searching tools; and weekly job blasts.


Registration: To register with the WERC program and receive employment assistance, please email our case manager, Casey Kautzmann, at cassandra.m.kautzmann.mil@mail.mil and 'cc' the program manager, Alex Hughes: alexandria.p.hughes.mil@mail.mil.


Job Openings: If you are interested in being included on our email distribution list to receive the weekly job blasts, information about our networking/upcoming events, or are simply looing for a way to connect to the job market, please register with WERC by emailing our case manager, Casey Kautzmann, at cassandra.m.kautzmann.mil@mail.mil. Please indicate that you wish to be added to the distribution list.


Partnerships: WERC bridges the gap between qualified Service Members and spouses with employers through the analysis of Service Member and employer needs. WERC recognizes that state and local agencies are working initiatives to build a robust workforce and we realize that no single agency or organization will achieve this goal on its own. WERC's intention is to partner with state and local agencies, such as the Department of Workforce Development and the Department of Veterans Affairs to serve as a complementary resource for Wisconsin military Service Members and spouses. If you are an employer, or part of an organization looking to partner with WERC, please email our program manager, Alex Hughes, at alexandria.p.hughes.mil@mail.mil, for more information about becoming an Employer Partner. We look forward to working with you!


CONTACT INFORMATION


Program Manager
Alex Hughes
alexandria.p.hughes.mil@mail.mil
608.242.3748


Case Manager
Casey Kautzmann
cassandra.m.kautzmann.mil@mail.mil
608.301.8247


While the WERC Team currently operates out of Madison, we provide employment assistance throughout the state. Please do not hesitate to reach out!


Tuesday, January 28, 2014

How to Write a Federal Resume

Need a step by step video to teach you about Federal Resumes and how you can write yours?

Check out YouTube's link to find out how:

 
 
Still want additional information or someone to assist in writing your resume?

Contact WERC's case managers:
Program Manager
SSG Ted Schumacher
theodore.r.schumacher2.mil@mail.mil
608.301.8246

Madison Office
Jessica Williams
jessica.e.williams54.mil@mail.mil 
608.301.8247
Waukesha Office
SGT Nicole Ellenson
nicole.a.ellenson.mil@mail.mil
608.242.3861

Friday, January 24, 2014

How Interviewers Know When to Hire you in 90 Seconds by Jorgen Sundberg


 
How Interviewers Know When to Hire You in 90 Seconds [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

We can’t get enough about the art of interviewing in these times. We all fret job interviews and prepare as much as possible but there is little way of predicting their outcomes.

 
Well at least we have some cool stats in this infographic complied by our friends at Come Recommended <http://www.comerecommended.com/> :

 
*     33% of bosses know within the first 90 seconds of an interview whether they will hire someone

*     Having little to no knowledge of the company is the most common mistake made during interviews (see: How To Plan Ahead for the Interview <http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/content/nervous-wreck-5-ways-shake-your-job-interview-anxiety> )

*     67% of bosses say that failure to make eye contact is a common nonverbal mistake

*     When meeting new people, 55% of the impact comes from the way the person dresses, acts and walks through the door

*     65% of bosses indicate that clothes could be a deciding factor between two almost-identical candidates (see: What To Wear To An Interview <http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/content/how-dress-your-job-interview> )

*     The number one question most likely to be asked is: “Tell me about yourself”

*     The number one most common mistake at a job interview is: failing to ask for the job

 

Employers Share Most Memorable Interview Blunders - Career Builders

Employers Share Most Memorable Interview Blunders

Nearly Half of Employers Know if a Candidate is a Good Fit Within the First Five Minutes

CHICAGO, January 16, 2014 – When it comes to a job interview, the first few minutes may be the most crucial. A new survey from CareerBuilder finds that nearly half (49 percent) of employers know within the first five minutes of an interview whether a candidate is a good or bad fit for the position, and 87 percent know within the first 15 minutes.
The national survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from November 6 to December 2, 2013, and included a representative sample of 2,201 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Most Memorable Mistakes
When asked to share the most outrageous mistakes candidates made during a job interview, employers gave the following real-life examples:
· Applicant warned the interviewer that she “took too much valium” and didn’t think her interview was indicative of her personality
· Applicant acted out a Star Trek role
· Applicant answered a phone call for an interview with a competitor
· Applicant arrived in a jogging suit because he was going running after the interview
· Applicant asked for a hug
· Applicant attempted to secretly record the interview
· Applicant brought personal photo albums
· Applicant called himself his own personal hero
· Applicant checked Facebook during the interview
· Applicant crashed her car into the building
· Applicant popped out his teeth when discussing dental benefits
· Applicant kept her iPod headphones on during the interview
· Applicant set fire to the interviewer’s newspaper while reading it when the interviewer said “impress me”
· Applicant said that he questioned his daughter’s paternity
· Applicant wanted to know the name and phone number of the receptionist because he really liked her

Common Mistakes
The top most detrimental blunders candidates make in interviews are often the most common, according to employers:
· Appearing disinterested – 55 percent
· Dressing inappropriately – 53 percent
· Appearing arrogant – 53 percent
· Talking negatively about current or previous employers – 50 percent
· Answering a cell phone or texting during the interview – 49 percent
· Appearing uninformed about the company or role – 39 percent
· Not providing specific examples – 33 percent
· Not asking good questions – 32 percent
· Providing too much personal information – 20 percent
· Asking the hiring manager personal questions – 17 percent
Communication involves much more than simply words, and forgetting that during an interview could harm your chances. Employers weighed in on the worst body language mistakes candidates make in job interviews:
· Failure to make eye contact – 70 percent
· Failure to smile – 44 percent
· Bad posture – 35 percent
· Fidgeting too much in one’s seat – 35 percent
· Playing with something on the table – 29 percent
· Handshake that is too weak – 27 percent
· Crossing one’s arms over one’s chest – 24 percent
· Playing with one’s hair or touching one’s face – 24 percent
· Using too many hand gestures – 10 percent
· Handshake that is too strong – 5 percent
“Employers want to see confidence and genuine interest in the position. The interview is not only an opportunity to showcase your skills, but also to demonstrate that you’re the type of person people will want to work with,” said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “Going over common interview questions, researching the company, and practicing with a friend or family member can help you feel more prepared, give you a boost in confidence, and help calm your nerves.”

Survey Methodology
This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive© on behalf of CareerBuilder among 2,201 hiring managers and human resource professionals (employed full-time, not self-employed, non-government) between November 6 and December 2, 2013 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 2,201, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 2.09 percentage points. Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

What NOT to do in the Interview - By Susan Ricker, CareerBuilder writer

What not to do in the interview
By Susan Ricker, CareerBuilder writer

In a job interview, there are plenty of ways to prove to a hiring manager that you're a great fit for the role -- highlighting your career wins and achievements, sharing your insights about the industry, aligning yourself with the company's values and so on. And there are also plenty of ways to prove that this isn't the job for you.
A new survey from CareerBuilder finds that nearly half (49 percent) of employers know within the first five minutes of an interview whether a candidate is a good or bad fit for the position, and 87 percent know within the first 15 minutes.
In that amount of time, most job seekers and hiring managers have barely gotten through introductions and the prompt, "Tell me about yourself." So what factors are influencing their decision? In a national survey, more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resources professionals across industries and company sizes shared what mistakes job seekers make in the interview process and the errors that turn them off to a candidate, as well as the most memorable mistakes they've seen.
Consider this your list of what not to do in the interview.
Mistakes everybody makes
If you didn't get called back after the interview, you may know why you weren't their top pick. However, most of us are left dazed and confused after the experience, not really sure what happened in there.
Unfortunately, hiring managers are more deft during the process and are judging your every move. What are they seeing? According to employers, the top most detrimental blunders candidates make in interviews are often the most common:
  • Appearing disinterested -- 55 percent
  • Dressing inappropriately -- 53 percent
  • Appearing arrogant -- 53 percent
  • Talking negatively about current or previous employers -- 50 percent
  • Answering a cell phone or texting during the interview -- 49 percent
  • Appearing uninformed about the company or role -- 39 percent
  • Not providing specific examples -- 33 percent
  • Not asking good questions -- 32 percent
  • Providing too much personal information -- 20 percent
  • Asking the hiring manager personal questions -- 17 percent
Your body language is also being evaluated by hiring managers. Here are the top mistakes employers reported:
  • Failure to make eye contact -- 70 percent
  • Failure to smile -- 44 percent
  • Bad posture -- 35 percent
  • Fidgeting too much in one's seat -- 35 percent
  • Playing with something on the table -- 29 percent
  • Handshake that is too weak -- 27 percent
  • Crossing one's arms over one's chest -- 24 percent
  • Playing with one's hair or touching one's face -- 24 percent
  • Using too many hand gestures -- 10 percent
  • Handshake that is too strong -- 5 percent
Mistakes nobody should make
Remember that every interview is a chance to improve and make a great impression. If you've made some of the more common mistakes, now's the time to turn things around and act more professionally in front of potential employers.
However, if you've made one of following more memorable mistakes in an interview, here's a stronger piece of advice: Never do that again.
When asked to share the most outrageous mistakes candidates made during a job interview, employers gave the following real-life examples:
  • Applicant warned the interviewer that she "took too much valium" and didn't think her interview was indicative of her personality
  • Applicant acted out a Star Trek role
  • Applicant answered a phone call for an interview with a competitor
  • Applicant arrived in a jogging suit because he was going running after the interview
  • Applicant asked for a hug
  • Applicant attempted to secretly record the interview
  • Applicant brought personal photo albums
  • Applicant called himself his own personal hero
  • Applicant checked Facebook during the interview
  • Applicant crashed her car into the building
  • Applicant popped out his teeth when discussing dental benefits
  • Applicant kept her iPod headphones on during the interview
  • Applicant set fire to the interviewer's newspaper while reading it when the interviewer said "Impress me"
  • Applicant said that he questioned his daughter's paternity
  • Applicant wanted to know the name and phone number of the receptionist because he really liked her
In the end, know that hiring managers are looking for a new team member and want to find somebody that's a good fit, and aren't rooting for you to fail. "Employers want to see confidence and genuine interest in the position. The interview is not only an opportunity to showcase your skills, but also to demonstrate that you're the type of person people will want to work with," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "Going over common interview questions, researching the company, and practicing with a friend or family member can help you feel more prepared, give you a boost in confidence, and help calm your nerves."

Friday, November 1, 2013

Franchising Oppotunity!


Baskin-Robbins is the world's largest chain of ice cream specialty shops and the #1 global premium ice cream brand. The company is in the midst of a strategic national expansion plan and is seeking exceptional franchise candidates. It is offering exclusive incentives to U.S. military veterans, including FREE Initial Franchise Fee (a $25,000 value!). Join Baskin-Robbins for a franchising webinar on November 13th at 9:00 pm EDT to learn about franchising opportunities and 2013 development incentives.

 The company's model combines superior unit economics with
operational simplicity. Franchisees enjoy convenient hours of operation, minimal equipment, and little waste.


Reasons to Invest

·         Unprecedented incentives are now available through 2013 for new franchisees.
·         New franchisees can enjoy a 10-year initial franchise fee payment plan and reduced royalty rates for five years.
·         Details are available in the Baskin-Robbins Franchise Disclosure Document.
·         U.S. military veterans new to Baskin-Robbins are eligible for a FREE 20-year initial franchise fee (a $25,000 value!) for their first shop. Additionally, Baskin-Robbins will waive royalty rates for the first two years of ownership and then significantly reduce the rates for years three through five.

 Baskin-Robbins is seeking new single and multi-unit developers to join the Baskin-Robbins family and bring More Flavors.More Fun.(r) to life in their neighborhood. 

 Ideal franchise candidates should meet the company's financial qualifications, have a passion for their local communities, a dedication to operational excellence and, of course, a love for ice cream.
 
 
If you are interested please contact your local case manager.